Lorine's cabin water lily

Resource information


Author: Renoir
Title: Jean Renoir, my father
Publisher: Little, Brown & Co., Boston, Mass.
Year of Publication: 1962
Type of document: Book

Notes: Illegible name on first page, plus "31st March 1966."

p. 23: Marked in margin: "In summer they danced in little open-air cafes under the trees on the outskirts of Paris. They have to be satisfied with a flesh-and-blood band."

p. 24: Marked in margin, "Renoir had a motorcar, and he used it as a matter of course to drive from Nice to Paris in two days. He had a telephone in his house, He had been operated on, and had had the benefit of anaesthetics. Childbirth was now painless. French people had acquired a mania for soccer. The little cafes had turned into cheap dancehalls. The Communist Revolution had taken place. Anti-Semitism was spreading. We had a gramophone; we had also bought a cine projector so that my young brother Claude could show films to my father. We had a crystal set. The newspapers were disturbed over the spread of drug-taking among the younger generation. Divorce was popular. There was talk, for the first time, of the right of peoples to self-government. The problem of oil preoccupied the world. Psychology had come into vogue. People were talking about a certain man named Freud. Homosexuality was becoming more common. Women had begun to bob their hair. Housewives were begging to use tinned foods, and they insisted that tinned peas were better than fresh ones. Income tax had come to stay."

p. 25: Marked in margin, "Our house was equipped with central heating, hot and cold running water, gas, electricity, and a bathroom.", "By the time my father died the industrial revolution was an established fact. Man had begun to believe that he could carry out this first serious attempt to escape from God's Curse.", "Before the arrival of the tube we could only get drunk on naturally fermented wine.", and "But by means of ‘the tube,' water was piped up to the top of the hill, with the result that Montmarte is now covered with huge grey houses, prisons for satisfied ants."

p. 26: Marked in margin, "I knew that it must be for some very urgent reason, otherwise the authorities would not have permitted a civilian to enter the war zone. The fact that she was Vera Sergine, one of the great theatre stars of the time, caused considerable excitement. THe commandant of the hospital was very much impressed, and he received her in his office while the orderlies and the less seriously injured hastened to tidy our ward.", "...a little bouquet of wild flowers to brighten up the place, warning us, however, that afterwards she would take it to the chapel where it properly belonged.", "Her attire seemed all the more strange to us as she was in mourning. She had come to break the news to me of my other's death. I was shocked by this new creature that it took me several seconds to grasp her terrible message." and "Our slave, our other half, had become our equal, our comrade. A new style, a few snips of the scissors, and above all the discovery that she could tackle work which so far been the province of the lord and master, had destroyed for good the social structure maintained by males for thousands of years."

p. 27: Marked in margins, "He much preferred to be out in the street. ‘In the streets of Paris I felt at home. There were no motor-cars then and you could stroll around as you pleased…'" and "But his Buddha-like posture seemed so natural to his children that when he came to the family table they were almost surprised to see him walk like an ordinary human being."

p. 28: Marked in margin, "The mattress was not very thick and the wooden bench felt hard under it, but he did not care: spring mattresses were luxuries reserved for the great of this world. What bothered him were the pins scattered on the floor, which stuck into his feet when he forgot to put on his slippers in the morning.", "He worked all day long, but as he was a simple man and his prices were reasonable, he made only a modest income. Yet if Renoir's childhood impressions are correct, his father was happy in his work.", "Seventy years later he could still feel in his fingers the boredom of opening all those pods.", and "My grandmother liked plenty of light and air."

p. 29: Marked in margin: An object had value for him only if it expressed the personailty of its creator. It could be a sculpture, a picture, a plate or a chair. It could be the humblest kitchen utensil or King Charlemagne's crown. What was vital was to be able to recognzie in the stone, wood or fabric the human being who had conceived and executed the work.Renoir even went so far as to assert that the defects of an object interested him as much as its virtues, and pettiness as much as grandeur of conception./Later, when his business improved, my grandfather rented a shop in the Rue de la Bibliotheque, just a step from the Rue d'Argenteuil: and my grandmother was at last able to have her parlour back.", and "The grass in particular makes me feel close to him. Though thin, it is tall and wiry, grey, except in winter, composed of the most varied species and sprinkled with the prettiest wild flowers imaginable."

p. 30: Marked in margin, "If you let yourself go, you get the feeling that Renoir is still there and that you are suddenly going to hear him humming as he studies his canvas. He is part of the landscape. It does not need much imagination to see him sitting there at his easel with his white linen hat half askew on top of his head. is emaciated face wears an expression of affectionate mockery. Except in the last few weeks, the sight of his pitifully thin and paralysed body did not worry us unduly; Gabrielle and my brother and I were not upset by it, nor was anyone close to him.", "the fact that his skin had remained as fair as that of an adolescent because it was constantly protected from the rays of the sun; for he had to keep his canvas away from the reflections of light, which he declared ‘play the devil' with one's work.", "He would often point out a bird of prey on the horizon, flying over the valley, or a lady-bird climbing up a single blade in a tuft of grass. We with our young eyes had to look carefully, concentrate and examine everything closely…", and "They always seemed to be laughing, perceiving the odd side of things. But it was a gentle and loving laughter. Perhaps it also served as a mask."

p. 24: Marked in margin, "Renoir had a motorcar, and he used it as a matter of course to drive from Nice to Paris in two days. he had a telephone in his house. He had been operated on, and had had the benefit of anaesthetics. Childbirth was now painless. French people had acquired a mania for soccer. The little cafes had turned into cheap dancehalls. The Communist Revolution had taken place. Anti-Semitism was spreading. We had a gramophone; we had also bought a cine projector so that my young brother Claude could show films to my father. We had a crystal set. The newspapers were disturbed over the spread of drug-taking among the younger generation. Divorce was popular. There was talk for the first time, of the right of peoples to self-government. The problem of oil preoccupied the world. Psychology had come into vogue. People were talking about a certain man named Freud. Homosexuality was becoming more common. Women had begun to bob their hair. Housewives were beginning to use tinned foods, and they insisted that tinned peas were better than fresh ones. Income tax had come to stay. Passports were compulsory, and so was military training."

p. 25: Marks in margin, "Our house was equipped with central heating, hot and cold running water, gas, electricity, and a bathroom.", "Man had begun to believe that he could carry out his first serious attempt to escape from God's Curse. The children of Adam were going to force the gates of the Garden of Eden, and science would enable them to earn their bread without toiling by the sweat of their brows.", "Before the arrival of the tube we could only get drunk on naturally-fermented wine. Piping has brought us the locomotive and the bathroom.", and "But by means of ‘the tube,' water was piped up to the top of the hill, with the result that Montmarte is now covered with huge grey houses, prisons for satisfied ants."

p. 26: Marks in margin, "I knew that it must be for some very urgent reason, otherwise the authorities would not have permitted a civilian to enter the war zone. The fact that she was Vera Sergine, one of the great theatre stars of the time, caused considerable excitement. The commandant of the hospital was very much impressed…", "...a little bouquet of wild flowers to brighten up the place, warning us, however, that afterwards she would take it to the chapel, where it properly belonged.", "Her attire seemed all the more strange to us as she was in mourning. She had come to break the news to me of my mother's death. I was shocked by this new creature that it took me several seconds to grasp her terrible message.", and "In the space of a few months she had cast off the outward signs of servitude. Our slave, our other half, had become our equal, our comrade. A new style, a few snips of the scissors, and above all the discovery that she could tackle work which had so far been the province of the lord and master, had destroyed for good the social structure maintained by males for thousands of years."

p. 27: Marks in margin, "The man in the next bed, a farmer from the Vendee declared thoughtfully, ‘If I find my wife rigged out like that when I get home, I'll giver her a kick in the --!'/Incidentally, I used this episode in my film La Grande Illusion.", "He much preferred to be out in the street. ‘In the streets of Paris I felt at home. There were no motor-cars then and you could stroll around as you pleased…'", and "But his Buddha-like posture seemed so natural to his children that when he came to the family table they were almost surprised to see him walk around like an ordinary human being."

p. 28: Marks in margin, "The mattress was not very thick and the wooden bench felt hard under it, but he did not care: spring mattresses were luxuries reserved for the great of this world. What bothered him were the pins scattered on the floor, which stuck into his feet when he forgot to put on his slippers in the morning.", "He worked all day long, but as he was a simple man and his prices were reasonable, he made only a modest income. Yet if Renoir's childhood impressions are correct, his father was happy in his work.", "Seventy years later he could still feel in his fingers the boredom of opening all those pods.", and "My grandmother liked plenty of light and air."

p. 29: Marks in margin, "An object had value for him only if it expressed the personality of its creator. It could be a sculpture, a picture, a plate or a chair. It could be the humblest kitchen-utensil or King Charlemagne's crown. What was vital was to be able to recognize in the stone, wood or fabric the human who had conceived and executed the work. Renoir even went so far as to assert that the defects of an object interested him as much as its virtues, and pettiness as much as grandeur of conception.", "Later, when his business improved, my grandfather rented a shop in the Rue de la Bibliotheque, just a step from the Rue d'Argenteuil: and my grandmother was at last able to have her parlour back.", and, "The grass in particular makes me feel close to him. Though thin, it is tall and wiry, grey, except in winter, composed of the most varied species and sprinkled with the prettiest wild flowers imaginable."

p. 30: Marks in margin, "If you let yourself go, you get the feeling that Renoir is still there and that you are suddenly going to hear him humming as he studies his canvas. He is part of the landscape. It does not need much imagination to see him sitting there at his easel with his white linen hat half askew on top of his head. His emaciated face wears an expression of affectionate mockery. Except in the last few weeks, the sight of his pitifully thin and paralysed body did not worry us unduly; Gabrielle and my brother were not upset by it, nor was anyone close to him.", "...apart from the fact that his skin had remained as fair as that of an adolescent because it was constantly protected from the rays of the sun; for he had to keep his canvas away from the reflections of light, which he declared ‘play the devil' with one's work.", "He would often point out a bird of prey on the horizon, flying over the valley, or a lady-bird climbing up a single blade in a tuft of grass. We with our young eyes had to look carefully, concentrate and examine everything closely…"

p. 31: Marks in margin, [from previous page] "They always seemed to be laughing, perceiving the odd side of things. But it was a gentle and loving laughter. Perhaps it also served as a mask. For renoir was extremely shy about his feelings and never liked to give away any sign of the motion that overpowered him when he looked at flowers, women or clouds, as other men touch a thing or caress it.", "The ‘mystery' was Renoir himself: a fascinating mystery which i shall not try to explain, but only comment upon, in this memoir. I could write ten, a hundred books on the subject of the Renoir mystery and I should be no nearer to solving it.", "Before he became paralysed his height was about five feet ten, but if he had been able to stand upright he might not have been as tall, for his spinal column had shortened slightly.", "On top, however, he was completely bald, a feature which was not visible since he always wore a cap, even indoors. His nose was aquiline and gave him an air of authority. He had a beautiful white beard, and one of us always kept it trimmed to a point for him. Curiously enough, it curved slightly to the left, owing to the fact that he liked to sleep with the bedclothes tucked well up under his chin." and "His Lavalliere cravat, royal blue with white polka-dots, was carefully knotted round the collar of his flannel shirt. My mother used to buy his cravats in and English shop, because French manufacturers had gradually let their blue turn to a slate colour…"

p. 32: Marks in margin, "In the evening, except in summer, a little cape was put round his shoulders. He wore high grey-checked felt carpet-slippers, or else plain dark brown ones with metal clasps."

p. 33: Marks in margin, "He accepted all these tributes with a grain of salt. Whenever people would start singing his praises, Renoir would quickly bring them down to earth: ‘Who? Me? A genius? What rot! I don't take drugs, I've never had syphilis, and I'm not a pederast. Well then…?'", "More important, I think that for Renoir a game of marbles was a means of ‘communicating'--that is, of joining with the other youngsters in the Louvre quarter: in other words, of satisfying one's insatiable need for the companionship of one's fellow beings. There is no doubt in Renoir's eyes to be a mere observer of humanity was both pretentious and sterile."

p. 34: Marks in margin with question mark, "He thought of himself a ‘workman-painter.' For the sake of convenience I shall in writing this narrative make use of the hated term ‘artist.' I ask my father's pardon for so doing, but word is now in such current use it is impossible to avoid it--in fact, he himself finally gave in to it."

p. 35: Marks in margin, "The first rule in their home was that the head of the family was not to be disturbed. The noise of the children made him nervous. If his attention was distracted from his work, it could result in a slip of the scissors and the ruin of a piece of Alencon cloth.", and "A man's suit might cost as much as a hundred francs. As the normal salary of a working man at that time was twenty francs a month, one realized how expensive clothing was."

p. 38: Marks in margin, "I ran the risk of being sent to some depot and made to do clerical work. Already at this period the very thought of boring routine work filled me with horror, a repugnance which has since led me to do many foolish things.", "It was his belief that you should never tempt fate: "One is merely a ‘cork,'' he said. ‘You must let yourself go along in life like a cork in the current of a stream.'" Underlines, "respect" with illegible note in margin. Marks in margin, "But all the bitterness and excess caffeine remained in the grounds. Renoir became very serious when he gave this recipe. He had no patience with those methods which attempted to extract more out of anything that it could yield." Underlines, "not like a tour de force". Marks in margin, "His theories were for other people, of course: he did not realize how much effort he himself put into his incessant work."

p. 39: Marks in margin, "It was all very well for that fool Galileo to assert that the earth is round and only one planet among countless others. Everyone accepts this but no one acts as though it were true. The garden is a unique kingdom and that his roses bear no relation to those of his neighbour." Underlines, "no one acts as though it were true". Marks in margin, "As it happens, theories and discoveries change the world only by means of disasters. A man believes in the explosive power of gunpowder only when a bomb bursts near him… Thinking that the world was flat did not keep the Egyptians from carving the statue of the ‘Seated Scribe;' or the Greeks the ‘Venus of Arles,' that buxom girl...you feel like patting her backside. The first awareness of Cleopatra's firm breasts can turn everything upside down just as surely as the knowledge that the earth is round.'" "There were animals, men, stones, and trees, which fulfilled their functions--and creatures that didn't." Circles, "live" with note in margin, ‘[illegible] meaning what?" Underlines, "respect for life." Marks in margin, "He used examples by way of illustration: ‘I had to shell green peas and I loathed it. But I knew that it was part of my life. If I hadn't shelled the peas, my father would have had to, and he would not have been able to deliver on time the suit…", and "I should add that this attitude was a joyous one, and that each stage of life was for him marked by amazing discoveries."

p. 40: Marks in margin, "He looked at the world with continual astonishment, a feeling of surprise which he made no effort to hide. I saw my father suffer absolute martyrdom, but I never saw him bored.", "His chief charge against ‘progress' was that it had substituted assembly-line production for individual creation. I repeat: an object even one intended for temporary use…", "‘It isn't natural,' he declared. ‘A child can't have several fathers. Can't you just see a boy with ears inherited from one father…" Underlines, "limited company", with note in margin, "corporation". Marks in margin with question mark, "One pleasant characteristic of my grandparents' home was that there were no knick-knacks in it. My grandmother detested all those little accessories and mementoes for which women generally have such a passion.". Marks in margin, "Even in her younger years at Saintes, Marguerite Merlet had never used powder or face-cream, nor rouged her lips. She put her faith in kitchen-soap. A good stiff brush and plenty of suds washed the dirt off the hides of the Renoir family just as thoroughly as it did off their floors."

p. 41: Marks in margin, "This drainage system, which in those days represented the last word in hygiene, was called ‘the leads,' doubtless because all the pipes, which were visible along the side of the staircase, were made of lead. The lavatories formed part of these same ‘leads.' Tooth-brushes were still a luxury." Underlines with check mark, "salt water". Marks in margin, "Once the lucky candidate had bathed and the others had dipped their toes into the warm water, the two porters returned and emptied the tub in front of the neighbours, who disapproved of such ostentation." , "I should like to say further, that my grandparents never incurred debts, and they purposely avoided mixing with people better off than themselves for fear of getting involved in expenses which they could not afford.", and "Each Sunday she took her little family to a different church, preferably to High Mass because of the music. Sometimes she chose Saint-Roch. It was in front of this church that, sixty years before, Napoleon had cannonaded the Royalists…"

p. 42: Marks in margin, "Nor is it like the strong gales from the east of France, sharp as a razor and causing mental disorders and outbursts of collective madness. Before the carbon monoxide of motor-cars began to pollute it, the air of Paris was like everything that characterizes that city in its moderation and balance.", "There is nothing harsh in the landscape of the Ile de France. Today men try to destroy its harmony by the lack of subtlety in their colours, which better suit the northern countries. The cold light of the north can absorb violent greens and dazzling yellows: but not Paris.", "...unsightly walls crumple away under the action of the fine, persistent rain.", and "My grandmother saw to it that they were presentable no matter what the occasion."

p. 43: Marks in margin, "...but when not engaged in those two dangerous occupation he always wore the same clothes.", and "My father recalled being punished several times just because, owing to the poor light, he had been unable to make out the words in his book."

p. 44: Marks in margin, "...he was made to hold the tips of his fingers out to the master, who rapped them mercilessly with the ruler. The very recollection of this practice filled Renoir with anger. Not that he was against corporal punishment, for he considered it was less painful and less degrading than being reasoned with: the teacher who succeeds in convincing a pupil that it is wrong not to study his lessons has a false conception of democracy, for he backs up his arguments with the authority given him by his official position--his victory can only mean a surrender on the part of the child. If Renoir disapproved of hitting children on their fingertips, it was only because such chastisement was likely to damage the nails.", "‘You must protect the ends of your fingers: if you expose them, you may ruin your sense of touch, and deprive yourself of a great deal of pleasure in life.'", "My father would never outsmart anyone. For him, to be ‘smart' was the worst of misfortunes.", and "There was a great deal of singing in French schools at that period--a national custom which has unfortunately now disappeared."

p. 45: Marks in margin, "The field is now the Gare Saint-Lazare and the quarter called ‘Europe,' but in those days the terrain was teeming with game, especially hares."

p. 46: Marks in margin, "Of course it was just a whim, nevertheless he meant it at heart. Of all architects Viollet-le-Duc was the one he hated most--and heaven knows he disliked architects! He never forgave him for spoiling the cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris, and the one in Rouen."

p. 47: Marks in margin, "However, Renoir got the impression that Henri, Lisa and even his father were nervous, and he noticed that they were still using words as ‘people,' ‘liberty,' ‘universal suffrage,' etc. which had rarely been heard within the family circle. One and all seemed to want to vilify the name of Marshal Bugeaud."

p. 48: Marks in margin, "Gentlemen dressed in frock-coats replaced the royal family. The Louvre and Tuileries were baptized ‘Palaces of the People.' The cost of living went up and my grandfather was obliged to raise the price of the suits he made. the Palace Guard stayed on. The coat-of-arms of the House of Orleans was replaced by the words ‘Liberty, Equality, Fraternity.'" and "Thousands of republicans fled, and many emigrated to America, where their knowledge and professional skills contributed greatly to the prosperity of the New World."

p. 49: Underlines, "diligence" with note in margin, "a coach[?]"

p. 51: Marks in margin, "In lower-middle-class Paris circle religious fanaticism had long since disappeared and racial prejudice had not yet shown itself.", "...and could not rest until she had located its mother, who to her way of thinking was not culpable but simply a victim of a monstrous social system. When she could not find a baby to save, Lisa would pick up a stray dog or cat.", and "The young man was given a cordial welcome when he called. He often took Lisa dancing, and this was looked on favourably by all the family. But when he finally proposed to her she rebuffed him, saying,'What? Get married like any bourgeois!'"

p. 52: Marked in margin, "In that earthly paradise, it was said, everything was shared: the harvest, the women and the children. The idler received as much as the worker./In spite of his revolutionary ideas Charles Leray did not dare to flout the conventions. My father doubted if lisa had even been his mistress. ‘Her imagination runs away with her,' he commented.", and "...gave the gentleman a good box in the ears. Leray had won the day. A month later he and Lisa were married by the parish priest."

p. 53: Marked in margin, "But he thought the figures his son sketched all over the apartment floor were ‘not all bad.' Marguerite Merlet was inclined to agree with him. She gave Renoir some exercise books and a supply of pencils./'August will do something some day,' she said. ‘He's got the eye for it.'/She never called him by his first name, Pierre, as she thought that, coupled with ‘Renoir,' it made to many ‘r' sounds.", "He did likenesses of his parents, his brothers and sister, the neighbours, dogs and cats, in short, everyone and everything, as he was to do for the rest of his life. He looked upon the world as a ‘reservoir' of subjects created just for him./Not one of the volunteer models who posed for him at the start of his career ever supposed that such a pastime would eventually become his profession..", and, "He was very good at music, and he had a fine voice. His teachers, anxious that such a gift should not go to waste, wanted to have him taken into the celebrated choir of church of Sainte-Eustache. The choirmaster there was an unknown young composer by the name of Charles Gounod."

p. 54: Circles, "jargon" with illegible note in margin. Marked in margin, "When the candidates failed to meet the musical requirements they were dismissed to the accompaniment of loud protests and strong language from the indignant mothers, whose real jewellery and bright silk dresses filled Gounod with terror. To aid him in his trials he had an old priest who, having always officiated in the Halles district, was well acquainted with its jargon and spoke it fluently.", "His frail voice was the link which bound him to all the faithful hidden from him in the dim light. He was aware of their presence, transported by his high notes, pained if his voice became rasping. He discovered that communion between the artist and his public which is the essence of spiritual power, and he could achieve it without arousing his horror of personal exhibitionism.", and "‘What riches! To think how the priests have replaced that living light by the dead light of electricity,' said Renoir, and then added, ‘It is bottled light--only fit for corpses."

p. 55: Marked in margin, "Their faith and the beauty of the scene were tremendously moving./'Faces of men whose job it is to kill; bodies accustomed to carrying loads; men and women who know life and don't come to Mass to show off their Sunday clothes or for any sentimental reasons.", "In their theatres you could hear everything, so that a sigh from their prima donna would wring your heart. And what reds and golds, what Venuses and Cupids and Muses in painted wood!" Circles, "teat" with illegible note in margin. Marks in margin, "I really prefer imitation jewellry. The thought of what the other costs takes away half the pleasure…'/One night they were giving Lucia at the Opera."

p. 56: Marked in margin, "I had just married your mother, and as she like music I had given her a piano. Every evening when I came back from my studio the first thing I saw was that piano. Why waste an evening in an uncomfortable theatre looking at what I can see at home in my slippers and smoking a good pipe? I got up and left before the end of the performance.'", "He did not like the ‘burr' in the speech of people on the outskirts of Paris, as he considered it affected; nor did he care for snobbish speech which imitated the English, including their slight lisp. Errors in grammar irritated him.", and "He avoided coarse words as much as possible, reserving them for a limited number of personal enemies, among whom were literary men and ‘literary' painters in particular."

p. 57: Marks in margin, "If Gounod's proposition had been the only one, he would have accepted it, in accordance with his policy of the ‘cork;' and his parents would have given their approval. But a friend of the Davids, M. Levy, the owner of a porcelain works in the Rue Vielle du Temple, offered to take him on as an apprentice. Porcelain: Limoges--Leonard's very dream! My father decided on porcelain. He bade his master a tearful good-bye./Gounod said to him: ‘Do you realize that the tenor you heard in Lucia earns ten thousand francs a year?'/But even in those days money had little attraction for Renoir.", "Renoir had an almost physical aversion to doing anything he did not like, He was never able, for instance, to teach. He was like a human sponge, absorbing everything that had to do with life.", and "The role of professor, which implies a ‘giving' of oneself, seemed unrealistic to him, who wanted only to take. Of his own unbelievable selflessness he had no conception./It was the same in Renoir's personal life. Even as a child he had a tendency to be economical."

p. 58: Marks in margin with question mark, "‘I would walk on the soft earth along the side of the street in order to avoid wearing out the soles of my shoes on the hard pavement.'" Underlines, "Nevertheless". Marks in margin, "Renoir began porcelain-painting with the sober enthusiasm he put into everything he did Deep down he doubted whether his employer's wares would ever represent the ideal of plastic beauty.", and "Even the stupidest worker puts a little of himself into what he is doing. A clumsy brush-stroke can reveal his inner artistic dreams. I prefer a dull-witted artisan any day to a machine…'"

p. 59: Marks in margin, "She went to see the owner of the porcelain-works, called him an exploiter, and threatened to get a job for ‘Auguste' with a competitor across the street. The good man did not fancy losing his new recruit, who was, he said, ‘a quiet, well-bred boy.'", "...and with a large beard like that worn by Napoleon III, which gave him a false air of vitality. He finally consented to pay Renoir by the piece./'I'll start him on dessert-plates at two sous the plate; three sous for Marie Antoinette in profile.'", and, "The good man was alarmed, but his wife, who sometimes like to run her hand through the young artisan's light-brown hair, persuaded him to agree."

p. 60: Marks in margin, "Despite the banality of the object and the evident intention of doing a purely ‘commercial' piece, it revealed the hand of a great man. The vase unfortunately disappeared from my house during the Second World War. May its new owner enjoy it to the full!/Mme Levy was a tall brunette. Renoir was terrified of her at first. He had never yet had his arms round a woman.", and "The manufacturing side of the work fascinated Renoir. But M. Levy continued to oppose his desire to know more about it, for he was interested only in increasing the supply of Marie Antoinettes, which were selling better than ever./'We owe that to the guillotine,' said Renoir. ‘The bourgeoisie love martyrs--especially after a good meal, with plenty of wine and liqueurs!'/Even so, Renoir learned to mould vases and shape them on the potter's wheel. The old workman who tended the kilns became his friend and taught him the secret of firing."

p. 61: Marks in margin, "But Renoir was too occupied watching the pieces of chine turn from red to orange and her attempts to lure him failed./The old workman was amused. ‘You're too young, and I'm too old,' he remarked, with a chuckle, after she had gone. ‘She's out of luck.'", and "I must add that, with a few inevitable exceptions, for him women represented the materialization of his art. Renoir rightly refused to be an intellectual./'What goes on inside my head doesn't interest me. I want to touch…or at least to see!!' he would say."

p. 62: Marks in margin, "‘And whatever the opinion of Haussman and other vandals may be, it was much more healthy than it is now. The streets were narrow and the central gutter stank a little, but behind every house there was a garden. There were plenty of people who still knew the pleasure of eating freshly-picked lettuce.'", and "In 1855 this noisy collection of people was dispersed, classified and assigned places in the new central market, or ‘Halles,' which had just been opened."

p. 63: Marks in margin, "‘The did the same thing with Notre Dame, which for centuries managed very well surrounded by old hovels. Since there is such a thing as art, I say that there is no art without life. And if you kill life… But then, confound it, it's because of our modern mania for wanting to be ‘distingue.' The bourgeois no longer want the smell of fish in their nostrils.'" with check mark.

p. 64: Marks in margin, "‘The only way to understand painting is to go and look at it. And if out of a million visitors there is even one to who art means something, that is enough to justify museums.'", and "‘Those women Jean Goujon carved have something of the cat about them. Cats are the only women who count, the most amusing to paint. But I remember a big nanny-goat: a superb girl! I've liked doing Pekinese, too. When they pout, they can be exquisite.'"

p. 65: Marks in margin with arrow, "They were lucky: I mean those stonecutters who carved the old cathedrals. To think of doing the same subjects all one's life: Virgin and Christ-child, the Apostles, the four Evangelists. I shouldn't be surprised if some of them did the same subject over and over again. What freedom! Not to have to be preoccupied with a story since it has been told hundreds of times. That's what is important: to escape from the subject-matter, to avoid being ‘literary' and so choose something that everybody knows--still better, no story at all.'" Underlines, "What freedom!". Corrects misspelling of "profession." Marks in margin, "Goujon had plenty of talent, but to stand up in reproduction the work must have enormous strength.'". Check mark in margin next to sentence, "One day I heard my father tell a group of friends which included Vollard the art-dealer and Gangnat the collector:". Underlines, "Gangnat".

p. 66: Marks in margin with question mark, "That is Degas's greatness: movement in a French style.'". Marks in margin, "The flight of a swallow is as eternal as the tranquillity of the ‘Seated Scribe' in the Louvre. The statues in the Luxembourg are over-active for intellectual reasons, for literary reasons."

p. 67: Marks in margin, "It may not be out of place to recall that the man who held these principles would rather have starved than betray them.", "The different stages which were to bring it about were not the result of good or bad luck. They were the normal and inevitable steps along the road he was destined to travel. Even before he himself was conscious of it, his hand was formed for painting as our tongue is made for speech.", and "I am still only just beginning, and I still go on making mistakes. … Take a farmer in Essoyes, to hear that masterpiece of all masterpieces, Mozart's Don Giovanni, he'd be bored stiff. He'd much prefer a cafe concert--despite that hypocrite, Jean-Jacques Rousseau."

p. 68: Marks in margin, "‘That's young Renoir: you know, the one who painted our Marie Antoinette!' Now, I know how little that means. The public is equally indifferent to what is good and to what is bad. And after a hundred years of slushy romanticism the French people have become sentimental.'", and "Then his eyes sparkled with malice, as he looked at his listeners. ‘My models don't think at all.'"

p. 69: Marks in margin, "Nowadays Frenchmen don't fart any more, but they talk like pretentious illiterates.'", "There was a vogue for everything Chinese. The Imperial Government was planning to establish a French settlement on the coast of Indo-China…", ‘Renoir politely admired the various vases, fashioned in complicated styles, and the many statuettes with their enigmatic smiles.", "‘I thought it all very pretty, very skilfull, but somehow it didn't mean anything to me. It was too clever! I was too young to realize that those idiots had chosen only things representing the decadence of a huge civilization.", "They had flecks of copper oxide on them--the kind of green that makes you think of waves…", "And yet he was a marvellous engraver. But fashion spares no one. It keeps you from seeing what is eternal.'", and "The Chinese pottery Renoir saw aroused his doubts about the value of the articles manufactured by his employer at the porcelain-works."

p. 70: Marks in margin, "But I liked talking with my mother at home in the evening. She was a very good woman and a wise one. She believed that I really could paint, but she advised me to save up my money for a year before launching out on any new experiment.'", "‘Rousseau amazed me, and Daubigny also; but I realized immediately that the really great painter was Corot. His work is for all time. Like Vermeer of Delft, he didn't paint just for his own day. I loathed Millet. His sentimental peasants made me think of actors dressed up to look like peasants.", "I like a forest scene that makes you feel there is water somewhere near. And in Diaz's painting you can almost smell the mushrooms, dead leaves and moss. His pictures remind me of walks with my mother in the woods at Louveciennes and the Forest of Marly.'", and "...shop-clerks and working-girls out on a spree--who started making fun of the working-man's smock he wore."

p. 71: Marks in margin, "You see, the trouble with ready-made clothing is that everybody can afford to look well-dressed--as well-dressed as a commercial traveller." Marks in margin, "Carpenters wore baggy corduroy trousers and a blue or red flannel sash round their waist, even on Sunday; house-painters wore a beret and a flowing tie. Now they've replaced pride in their profession by this idiotic vanity of trying to look like the bourgeoisie." Notes at the top, "R. rather harsh-sentimental: one vainly exchanges to another" and at the side, "ep. [two illegible notes]" next to this last marked passage. Marks in margin, "Provoked by his deliberate silence, one of them kicked his palette out of his hand. You can imagine how the others laughed….", "He was tall and strong, and he had a painter's outfit with him. He had a wooden leg, and he was carrying a heavy cane.", "While the victim of the attack was expressing his thanks, his one-legged benefactor picked up his canvas and examined it carefully./'You've got talent; a great deal of talent. But why do you paint in such dark tones?'/Renoir replied that a great many of the masters he admired used dark tones./'But even the shadows of the leaves have light in them.'"

p. 72: Marked in margin, "Bitumen is just a convention. It won't last….By the way, what is your name?'/The two men sat down on the grass and Renoir talked freely about himself, telling his new friend of his modest ambitions. The newcomer introduced himself in turn. His name was Diaz.", "‘Come and see me in Paris some time, and we'll have a good talk.'/In spite of his admiration for Diaz, Renoir never followed up the invitation.","'We would have exchanged ideas and discussed theories,' my father explained. ‘I was young, but I was already aware that a few pencil strokes are worth more than any number of theories, for me at any rate. I've never let a day go by without sketching something, even if it's only an apple on the page of a note-book. You lose the knack of it so quickly.'", and "Marie Antoinette's portrait could now be reproduced mechanically, thousands of times. It was the death-knell of a splendid craft. Renoir's employer stroked his beard for a long time while he mulled over the problem. To but printing machines of this kind required a considerable capital outlay."

p. 73: Marked in margin, "it rather amused her to try on a new dress and watch the effect on the more knowing workers, making it clear that she wore no corset because of the heat in the workroom. Young Renoir was not too timid to cast an appreciative glance down the opening of her low-cut bodice as Mme Levy leaned over to inspect his work.", "‘My moustache was beginning to grow, and that made her laugh,' he said. Then, after a pause, he added, ‘Don't trust anybody who doesn't get excited at the sight of a pretty breast.'", "Although only seventeen, he had created an attitude towards himself which he was to inspire in everyone until the day of his death: he was looked upon as a master. With perfect confidence, his fellow-workers placed their fate in the hands of ‘Monsieur Rubens,' As they had affectionately nicknamed him.", "Mme Levy pleaded with her husband to accept the proposition; he let himself be persuaded and put off raising melons till later. He would be needed to help the new co-operative with its commercial problem.s They all set to work feverishly.", and "Seconded by M. Levy he approached the wholesale dealers in the Rue du Paradis to discuss the possibility of their buying his wares. The cost-price he proposed was lower than that asked for machine-decorated articles. The dealers, alas, showed little interest in his offer. What they liked about the mass-produced dishes was that each one was an exact replica of the next."

p. 74: Marked in margin, "I was beaten from the start because of the public love for fashionable monotony. I had to give up.", "Those who want to go against it are either lunatics or conceited; or what is worse, ‘destroyers.' You swing the tiller over to the right or left from time to time, but always in the direction of the current.", "...and that he was credited with having changed the whole course of modern art. He gazed at me with an ironic smile./I ought to describe how his face looked when anything amused him--which happened often. You would have said that he exuded gaiety from every pore.", and "...but as catalysts of existing forces as yet unknown to the common run of mortals. Great men are simply those who know how to look and how to comprehend. He cited Saint-Just, whose proposal of the metric system was far from revolutionary."

p. 75: Marked in margin, "The ‘destroyers' are those who do not recognize the march of time and want to apply outworn solutions to new problems.", "But there are no apprentices any more, and as I prefer to paint rather than prepare my own pigments I buy them from my old friend Mullard, the dealer in artists' supplies at the foot of the Rue Pigalle, because he grinds them for me.", "I should be forgetting the important thing, that del Sarto lived in the days when people had plenty of time and that he had apprentices who worked without pay, so grinding pigments was economical. That is why I am willing to get my paints in tubes.", "This passive attitude brought its reward. Paint in tubes, being easy to carry, allowed us to work from Nature, and Nature alone.", "...nothing of what the journalists were later to call Impressionism. Nevertheless, I am sorry there are no apprentices any longer. I hate the metric system, which is a creation of the mind, it has replaced measurements based on the human body…", and "...which represents so effectively the distance an ordinary man can walk in one hour without getting tired."

p. 76: Marked in margin, "He knew that with the Odiot company he would be assured of an honourable living to the end of his days, and he aspired to nothing more. The Henri Renoirs never had any children and all their married life were able to indulge in two passions…", "My Aunt Blanche had a mania for auction sales and bargains. One day she came home with fifty umbrellas, which she had hired a porter to carry for her. At two sous each, she had not been able to resist such a bargain.", "The girls found his wit irresistible and it led to a great many love-affairs. My grandfather disapproved. For him life had not been an adventure but a long and toilsome road, though often quite pleasant, and he had made his way along it confidently, accompanied bya companion who had never failed him. He insisted on mutual confidence between men and women. But perfect trust can only be had with a single person, because it must be reciprocal. Without it, life becomes a battle, which generally results in defeat for the man because women are ‘awfully strong.' My grandmother Marguerite was secretly proud of Victor's conquests; but of all her children, my father remained her favourite."

p. 77: Marked in margin, "If no one turned up, then the family had to eat cold boiled beef for the rest of the week. My father did not mind, because he was fond of the pickles which went with it. When the season for pickling came round my grandmother mobilized all the children and their friends if necessary, for the preparation of this condiment.", "He always had a few notes in his pockets in case of need. For himself, he would make an awful fuss over buying a box of matches, but for other people he would hand out a thousand francs without batting an eye-lid. Your mother knew he was like that but she never let on. Yet your family wasn't rich. They had everything they needed and all of the best, but they were not rich.", and "He began to cry, thinking of the master as a young man, ‘I knew he would be a great painter; and so alive, like quicksilver.'He gave me an antique soup-tureen to take to the master: a white soup-tureen of old Paris earthenware.'" Underlines, "so alive, like quicksilver."

p. 78: Marked in margin, "Eve tempted by the serpent which was coiled around the branch of the tree. The whole family awaited the amster's verdict while he stood for a long time contemplating the picture. Finally he declared that young August was a real artist, and that he should not turn a deaf ear to his vocation. Some years later Laporte met him again, after Renoir had become celebrated, and said to him:/'YOung man, if you had remained faithful to bitumen, you would have become another Rembrandt.'/My father was very moved by his sincere compliment, but not enough to be converted to the use of of bitumen." Illegible note next to this last passage. Marked in margin, "He himself had little liking for wit.", and "You can ruin a friendship by a witty remark. Words can be very dangerous. They can start you off in the wrong direction; worst of all, they can hide your real thought."

p. 79: Marked in margin, "He once told me with great pride that he had never owed anyone so much as a sou. ‘And I never died of hunger.'", "...but he wore the same kind of white smock and spoke the same precise language the Paris artisans use to set themselves apart from the ordinary run of working-people.", and "As he told me the story, my father yielded to a pardonable show of naive vanity. For anyone who had allowed himself to be taken in so often in life, this little white lie was almost Machiavellian."

p. 80: Underlines, "metier" with note, "trade". Marks in margin, "The owner realized quickly enough that it would be to his advantage to allow his new employee a free hand in following his own inspiration ‘provided that what I portrayed was edifying.' My father had a very good time at it./'I had hit on a trick,' he told me, with a wink. ‘I did lots of clouds. You see, a cloud can be daubed on with a few brush-strokes.'/The blind maker with the Louis-Phillipe side-whiskers was worried. He had the same misgivings as the porcelain-manufacturer./'Such skill isn't natural,' he declared. ‘Earning so much with so little effort won't do you any good in the long run.'", and "My father was extremely prudish. I myself could not tell him of my adventures with women without feeling embarrassed. But we succeeded sometimes in overcoming this reticence, especially when I felt I was amusing him. We even got to the point of exchanging dirty stories, and without mincing words. In general, they were about people we did not know."

p. 81: Marks in margin, "While not envying her, the brother-in-law and his wife admired her for being so enterprising./'She's in luck, all right,' the wife said, ‘but she deserves it. There's not a speck of dust anywhere in her house.'", "I am not sure whether she was his first mistress or not. My father spoke of her several times without going into details, and I did not press the point. i know that he mentioned Berthe's name during a talk with his friend Lestringuez on the subject of jealousy. Was he alluding to his own experience when he made fun of young men who do not know the delight of being shut up in a wardrobe during the visit of the titular lover?", "You do a lot of foolish things when you are young--it doesn't matter then, because you haven't yet taken on any responsibilities. But afterwards you'd be a fool to play around with cheap tarts instead of ausing yourself with painting. Of course, there's syphilis, but with ‘606'---". "606" is circled with note, "prophylaxis? [?]". Marked in margin, "Before marriage you do what you please. You owe nothing to anybody and you harm nobody but yourself. But afterwards, when you've given your word to a life-companion, that sort of behaviour is treason. And it always ends badly."

p. 82: Marks in margin, "‘It's not much fun to spend the night with a whore. The best part is what leads up to it. Later, it's ghastly. But there's always the risk. It's the risk that adds spice to the affair.'/It is very probable that Berthe got interested in another lover and let m father go.", "‘How can you know that you aren't in the wrong? You lose your head; you don't know what you're doing. Afterwards you regret it. You feel guilty. All women are unbearable at times…. We are, too.'", "When you grow old together, neither of you notices how the other looks. you don't see the surplus fat or the wrinkles. Love is made up of a great many things and I'm not clever enough to explain them. But I know it is also habit.", "‘I loved women even before I learned to walk,' he said. And he began to talk to me for the hundredth time about his mother./It was no ‘Oedipus complex.' Renoir had been the most normal of children, just as he was to be the most normal of men."

p. 83: Marks in margin, "‘Women don't question anything. With them the world becomes something quite simple. They put the right value on things and they know that their washing is just as important as the constitution of the German Empire. You feel reassured when you're with them.'", "‘Young Germain once told me I ought to have a valet. Fancy having a man to make my bed and leave his cigarette-ends on the mantelpiece!'", and "For instance, in speaking of St. Peter's in Rome he said that it was: ‘a complete success, from an industrial point of view: a regular factory for mass-production religion.'"

p. 84: Marks in margin, "Once he was alone again, Renoir repeated, ‘I can't stand having anybody around me but women.'/And women returned his affection for them./When I was in school, I had a friend whose grandmother had known my father well.", "‘You don't look like him. You must take after your mother.'", "‘If you only knew how much everybody liked him!' she axclaimed. And she lowered her eyelids and smiled./I was about ten at the time. i had never seen so many wrinkles on a human face before.", "She added that she did not want to see my father again because ‘it is no use; it is better to keep one's memories.'", "...but he had even more with women, with whom his relations however tentative and delicate were always on the point of turning into something more romantic./It should not be thought, however, that his admirations was blind.", and "Some people like hot countries, other prefer social life. Renoir bloomed both physically and spiritually when in the company of women. Men's voices tired him, women's voices soothed him. He wanted all the female servants to sing, laugh and feel at ease when working around him. The more naive and even stupid their songs were, the more pleased he was. How often I used to hear him ask, ‘Why isn't La Boulangere singing to-day? She must be ill. Or else the idiot has had a row with her lover?'"

p. 85: Underlines, "reasoning". Marks in margin, "‘I can't see myself getting into bed with a lawyer.' And he added sharply: ‘I like women best when they don't know how to read; and when they wipe their baby's behind themselves.'", "Renoir believed in the constantly renewed discovery of the world through direct contact with its physical elements, and the more accessible these element are to us the more important the discovery.", "when he was reminded that Newton was endowed with genius he retorted that a farmer's wife who knew how to make good cheese had just as much./'Why teach women such boring occupations as law, medicine, science and journalism, when men excel in, when women are so fitted for a task which men can never dream of attempting, and that is to make life bearable." Underlines and marks in margin, "to make life bearable.". Check mark by, "I am afraid the generations to come won't know how to make love well, and that would be most unfortunate for those who haven't painting.'". Marks in margin, "...and the best exercise for a woman is to kneel down and scrub the floor, light fires or do the washing: their bellies need movement of that sort."

p. 86: Check mark by paragraph, "‘You'll find fewer and fewer of those pretty tarts who lose their heads when they give themselves completely. There's a risk that love-making, even the most normal, may become a kind of masurbation.'" Marks in margin, "He was firmly convinced that the triumph of principle was apparent rather than real, and likely to produce an immediate reaction:/'When women were slaves, they were really mistresses. Now that they have begun to have rights, they are losing their importance. When they become men's equals, they will really be slaves.'", "They don't know they're digging their own graves. And it's the workers who will gain by it, for the simple reason that they live in slums and work underground.' The condition of miners seemed to him atrocious. ‘We'll pay for it some day,' he warned.", and "In order to perform the operation properly it was necessary for the husband or lover to place his knee against the victim's backside so that she could brace herself while he pulled the laces with all his might. Renoir protested against this brand of torture."

p. 87: Marks in margin, "But when it comes to fashion, they go completely out of their minds. And it's all to fill the pockets of the corset-makers, who ought to be put in prison!", "...he sometimes compared a woman undressing to one of those circus number in which the clown takes off half-a-dozen vests.", "The feminine frailty which irritated him most was their way of doing their hair. ‘Instead of leaving their hair alone, they twist it around, burn it, tug at is unmercifully, fluff it up like sheep's wool or make it look like a weeping-willow.", "‘I could have killed her!' he declared, and concluded, ‘But that's the other side of the medal; and why should we ask logic of women, when it makes men so odious?'", "In the first place, so far as he was concerned no one was either damned or blessed. Everyone had a role to play in life, and that was all. The part played by prostitutes in a social system based on inheritance was perfectly obvious to him.", and "‘It's all a question of money. The lord of the manor didn't want his wife to deceive him because his domain might go to a bastard if she did. And so chastity-belts came in…. And whores were necessary in consequence, because if you amuse yourself by begetting a few bastards on your neighbor's wife there's no reason why your neighbour shouldn't come and do the same for you.'"

p. 88: Marks in margin, "‘But one never knows. Women with the strongest characters are sometimes subject to fits of inexplicable weakness. All they need then is for a good-looking pimp to come along---' He seriously recommended having the family name passed on through the female side: ‘It would be a surer way.'" and "They had not yet been affected by the wave of prudery which was spreading over England, and they had kept up the charming eighteenth-century custom of letting their breasts show over the top of their bodice."

p. 89: Marks in margin, "The doctor explained ot him that the only really dangerous veneral disease was syphilis./'Your sister considers you a great painter,' he said. ‘A great many geniuses have been syphilitic. Perhaps I ought to wish you had caught that disease.'/My father thanked him, but he was still uneasy. Even so, he went back to see his conquest.", "..that she offered to support him as her pimp. ‘Instead of doing those blinds you could do a portrait of me,' she suggested. Renoir was in a quandary. ‘On the contrary, I envy them. But it takes up too much time; and besides, you have to have the gift.'", and "In any case he must have embellished it considerably. As regards to women in general, I remember on of his remarks:/'I feel sorry for men who are always running after women.'"

p. 90: Marks in margin, "‘I could see her fallen breasts through her veils, so I got out of it by saying we didn't have the rock or the ocean.'/She brought him books to read. He had never read much except the French classics. He knew Ronsard by heart but had little knowledge of Victor Hugo.", and "You shouldn't gorge on books; but if you do, then you should read only masterpieces. The great writers bring us nearer to Nature; the Romantics drive us away. The ideal would be to read only one book during one's whole life. The Jews do it by sticking to the Bible, and the Arabs to the Koran. For myself, give me Rabelais any day!'"

p. 91: Marks in margin, "Those put on by the circus, which preceded the Cirque d'Hiver, were famous. As well as sideshow barkers there were vendors of hair-tonic and hawkers of corn-remedies. The dentists who pulled teeth in public, however, and the doctors who sold their universal panaceas had long since disappeared."

p. 93: Marks in margin, "Because of all this, he consoled himself with whores and painting. There is some truth in the theory that obstacles in one's path do help, but they are not sufficient: or perhaps they suffice in the case of inferior activities such as business or politics. Rockefeller's character was probably influenced by his weak stomach…" and "When she gave me this description of him, I often asked Gabrielle: ‘Do you think he was self-conscious about his deformity?'/'Not at all,' she replied. ‘He joked all the time. He was always asking after the master, and his eyes shone with real tenderness. He was very fond of the master.'"

p. 94: Marks in margin, "‘I had taken Venus rising from the waves for my subject. And I can assure you that I didn't spare either the Veronese green or the cobalt.'/The customers came in great numbers to admire the Venus and drink a beer or two, and in this way Renoir got other commissions./'I painted at least twenty cafes in Paris,' Renoir asserted cockily. ‘How I would like to do decoration again, like Boucher, and transform entire walls into Olympuses."

p. 98: Marks in margin, "‘--Yes and no. I need to feel all the excitement of life stirring around me, and I'll always need it.'", and "‘A great deal,' he said. ‘In spite of the teachers. The discipline of having to copy the same anatomical model ten times is excellent. It's boring, and if you weren't paying for it you wouldn't bother to do it. But the Louvre is the only place to learn, really. And while I was a Gleyre's, the Louvre for me meant Delacroix.'"

p. 99: Marks in margin, "‘Not at all. In your own district you can get to the bottom of things. being provincial is an inability to discern. In Paris you can choose, use your discernment." and "Every time she came to the school she asked if the model could be allowed to take of his ‘little panties.' Gleyre, a sturdy Swiss, who wore a beard and was near-sighted, refused flatly."

p. 100: Marks in margin, "Renoir did not answer. His attention had been attracted by a baby crying in its pram. Its nurse had left it for a moment to flirt with a trumpeter in the hussars who was loitering near by./'That infant is going to choke to death.'/He walked over and timidly rocked the pram. The child stopped crying, and the sudden silence made the nurse turn round. Seeing a stranger leaning over the baby, she uttered a cry of alarm."

p. 101: Marks in margin, "I must digress here to give the reader some explanation of the incident in the Luxembourg Gardens. My father often told me how frightened he was of crowds, and how hostile they were to him. He cited a number of instances. I have already recounted the one relating to DIaz and the rowdies. It is difficult to account for the enmity of strangers towards one who inspired the most devoted affection in those who really knew him. Once more I must touch on the quality of ‘strangeness' which emanated from Renoir."

p. 102: Note in margin, "cp. Japan!" Marks in margin, "To return to Bazille, my father's new acquaintance came from a wealthy family of the old Parisian bourgeoisie. His parents were acquainted with Edouard Manet, and he had been invited several times to visit the master in his studio./'Manet is as important to us,' he said, ‘as Cimabue or Giotto were to the Italians of the Quattrocento; and as the Renaissance is beginning again, we must be part of it…. Do you know Courbet?'/Bazille and Renoir began to plan to get together a ‘group'' of artists who would carry on still further the researches of these two masters. They half sensed they were on their way to Impressionism. Their conversion to the cult of Nature had already started. They did not hesitate to steal the time they usually spent in the museums to study the dazzling spectacle of autumn foliage."

p. 103: Marks in margin, "Wat he is dealing with is good paint, mixed with good linseed oil and a drop or two of turpentine.'", "The important fact is,' he added, ‘that Bazille had a great deal of talent--and courage, too. You need plenty of it when you have money, if you want to avoid becoming a mere society-man. Our discovery of Nature turned our heads.", and "His pupils, as though quite by chance, had left in full view the pictures of the male model, whom they had deliberately portrayed without his drawers. they had even equipped the gentleman with attributes of a size to make Karagueze sick with envy."

p. 104: Marks in margins, "And he picked up the offending piece with his hand to show the Ambassadress that it was only an imitation. However, by some mystery which was never explained, that day it turned out to be the real thing!", "After contemplating it for a moment, he said: ‘Young man, you are fery skilful, fery gifted, but no doubd you dook up bainding chust to amuse yourzelf.' To which Renoir replied, ‘Certainly. If it didn't amuse me I wouldn't be doing it.' His retort has rightly been considered by several authors of other works on Renoir as being a declaration of his artistic principles.'", "He was also among the first in his final examination. Fantin-Latour, then at the height of his glory, made no secret of his admiration for Renoir when he visited the Atelier Gleyre and singled out this pupil ‘whose virtuosity harks back to the Italian Renaissance.' He invited my father to come

Date last updated: 04/12/16

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